LinkedIn Tip # 132 – “What is the best way to get engagement?”

27Sep

“I see people tagging well connected people but I don’t feel like that is right if I really don’t have a strong connection with them.”

In response to the question and statement above from a valued connection on LinkedIn, I thought it pertinent to answer it here.

Tagging well connected people increases your visibility with their network. When they like and share your posts, there is a huge possibility of connections for you to people you need and want to know for business.

Before LinkedIn closed it down, there was a way to check what your extended reach was. Back then, I probably only had around 5500 connections on LinkedIn, and an extended reach of over 94,000,000. I also wondered back then why this was relevant?

When you tag people in your network who are huge centers of influence, make sure that you choose people who have over 500+ connections in their networks. (If you are on the free platform, you can only see the 500+. If you are on a paid platform you can find their total connection number on their profile. You just need to know where to look.)

You see, it is not all about you and the people you are directly connected to. It is about who THEY are connected to. Remember it is not all about you. Networking online works through the united cooperation of many connected individuals, whose networks are also interconnected. The online web of connections is a huge matrix, far larger than any one person can imagine. If little ole me can have an extended reach of over 94 million with only 5500 connections, there must be more to this LinkedIn matrix than we can imagine.

Take it a step farther.

When you tag people, also check what groups they are in and join one of those groups. Once you are accepted in the group, you can use your free inmail to send a direct message to them and start building a relationship with them. You get 15 free inmails a month, and they can only be used in the groups.

Remember that you are building a relationship with them first. Find out what they are looking for and see if there is someone in your network you can introduce them to.

Don’t worry! They will turn around and ask about you too. When they do. Please-Please-PLEASE don’t slap them in the face with a pitch!

You are merely reaching out to your connections/centres of influence to find a need, want or desire that you may be able to help them with.

Reach out with love of other people in your heart. Stop thinking, “What can I say to help close a sale here?” If this is your approach, people will run away in droves!

Remember, it takes time to build the relationships you need and want for business.

Got a LinkedIn question? Send me a message with your question and I will answer it here in my blogs.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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Marketing Tip # 30 – Is your Message Box Full?

1May

When was the last time you called someone and they did not pick up the phone, but when you tried to leave a message…their mailbox was full?

What went through your mind when this happened to you?

Did you feel affronted? How did you feel?

Here is what usually happens subconsciously to us when we receive a message like this. Many times the person we are calling has either called you, or you have set up a time to chat. It may even be an off the cuff “thinking of you” call. All the same, you could not leave them a message.

How rude is that?!

Are you feeling like you even want to call them back? Or do you want to do business with them?

People that do not empty their mailboxes on a regular basis probably need to get an assistant if they are that busy, but most of the time, they are just unorganized.

So, if you are unorganized and if you want more business, that message box needs to become a priority.

Having a full message box tells people you are not ready to do business.

How do you feel when you are confronted with “this message box is full”?

Personally, it makes me feel like I do not want to do business with this person.

I would love to read some of your comments about your feelings toward people with full message boxes.

How can we help these people see the light?

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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LinkedIn Tip # 117 – Are you Liking and Sharing?

19Apr

Are you wondering why people just “like” your posts?

I see people liking people’s posts all the time on all levels of social media. However, people seem far more hesitant to share a great post on LinkedIn than any other social platform.

Do you know why that is?

I do.

It isn’t because they are jealous of any competition.

The main reason people don’t share other people’s great posts is because they do not want to take away from their own marketing program.

Know what?

Those marketing programs are all very “me” centered.

Zig Zigglar always said: “If you help enough people get what they want, then you will get what you want.”

Are you helping people get what they want? Or are you helping people get what you want?

Think about it.

The schooling I have had and the books I read speak about building credibility and trust with our potential clients before they will ever buy from us.

If someone comes to my “store” and I don’t have the right fit for them, I always refer them to someone I know can help them. Those people remain my loyal friends and come back to me later for things that I can help them with. They are also more likely to refer me to their contacts as well.

The way social media works best is by sharing one another’s posts. There might be someone in my network, for instance, who can use something from someone I am connected with. By sharing a great post about a product or service from one of my connections with my network, I open up a whole other network of possible customers for them.

The product or service will not take away from me, because it is not something that I would use for my business, but I know that other people could use it.

“You scratch my back, and I’ll scratch yours.” That is the principle behind sharing other people’s posts on LinkedIn.

Also, take a moment to comment on the post as well.

When you do this, here is what happens. The person that you shared their post for will check out your profile and notice you every time you share and comment and like their posts. Pretty soon, you will notice that they will also start to do the same with your posts.

When you just “like” the posts from your network, you are telling them that you are hiding in a way by “holding your cards close to your chest”.

One thing you can do to help get the ball rolling is to post some great quotes. These will help people start to recognize you and create activity with your posts. Then throw in a few of your own blogs and one pitch about your company.

If you always post about your company and all the things your company does, you will also turn people off and they will perhaps “like” your post out of courtesy, but they will not comment on or share it.

The next time you are on LinkedIn checking your Home page, check out some of the other posts and make a conscious effort to check out profiles of people whose posts you like. If you are impressed with their profile, Like, Share and Comment on their posts.

I have built many great friendships as a result of doing this very thing.

Check out some of my other posts on LinkedIn.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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LinkedIn Tip #116 - Have you set up your LinkedIn Profile like a Business Page?

19Apr

Are you confused as to what exactly you can do to promote your business on LinkedIn?

Have you set up your LinkedIn profile like a business profile…no experience listed…no education listed…excluding all the personal information?

Recently I received a message from LinkedIn regarding violations of their Terms of Use. LinkedIn suggested I get in touch with all my LinkedIn connections to warn them about this serious violation.  LinkedIn is taking drastic measures to send profiles in violation of the LinkedIn Terms of Use to “LinkedIn Jail”.

One of the things I did when I first started setting up my profile on LinkedIn 9 years ago is read the entire Terms of Use! I wanted to make sure that I was behaving myself on their platform. I also wanted to know how to protect myself.

Right in the beginning of the Terms of Use, LinkedIn says that profiles that are not in compliance will be sent to “LinkedIn Jail” (or words to that effect).

What is “LinkedIn Jail”?

“LinkedIn Jail” is not being able to open your LinkedIn profile one day. No matter what you do, you cannot get into your profile. Your password does not work. Your email does not work. You simply cannot access your profile no matter what you do. This is “Linkedin Jail”.

“LinkedIn Jail” means your account is frozen.

Once your account is frozen, it takes at least 10 days to two weeks to gain access again. LinkedIn puts you through a myriad of hoops to qualify to have access to your profile again.

Now just what will get your profile frozen?

One of the key things that will get your account frozen faster than anything else on LinkedIn is simply setting up your profile like a business page.

Your profile page is for your personal profile. Once you set up your profile page, then you can set up your FREE Company page. Then you can promote your Company page like crazy. Invite people to follow your page. Be active on your page. Be responsive on your page.

Every day I meet LinkedIn profile pages that have been set up like a company page. The business logo is displayed where the personal headshot should appear. The background picture is all about their business. The page is set up purely as a business.

I know that many people do not want to have their personal information listed on LinkedIn, but if you want to use LinkedIn for promoting your business, and you try to hide, people will not trust you.

Business is built on the basis of Know, Like, and Trust. It takes time to build Trust. People Trust people first before they will Trust your business.

Your business cannot build Trust all by itself. Your business needs to be associated with a person and the Trust must be built with the person first before people will ever take a look at your business.

How trustworthy are you? How trustworthy do you appear on your LinkedIn profile.

Stop hiding and you will gain credibility and Trust.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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Review of A House Divided

19Apr

Hannah was killed by her own son!

This was not in her vision of being given in marriage to a Son of Lehi. She was to “live a life of righteousness with a worthy priesthood holder”.

How could a son of Lehi and her own child have gone so wrong?  Why? Why? Why?

What could possess your own son to stone his own mother?

This sequel to Daughter of Ishmael completely surprised me! What happens next totally threw me for a loop.

The story carried me into thinking more deeply about what women must have experienced during the times of Lehi’s family in the new world.

I was drawn into the story as though I was standing right there watching and experiencing everything right along with the families of Lehi and Ishmael. I could smell the bushes, the tents made of hides and the fires burning. I could feel the blows of anger and the harsh words.

Then when there were words and actions of love and kindness, they were a relief to me as I felt how the characters in A House Divided lived their uncertain lives in this new country.

As I read A House Divided, I gained a deep respect for the people of Lehi because of how the righteous became stronger and stronger in their faith in God.

I am impressed with the strength of Nephi and how he was told by the Lord what he needed to do…and he just “Did it”!

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

 

Linkedin Tip #111 - 12 Things You Need To Check On A Profile Before You Connect.

14Dec

Have you ever connected with someone on LinkedIn and then discovered that there was no real way you could ever help them with business? Or have you connected with people on LinkedIn and then wished you had not connected with them?

Here are some ways you can make sure that the connections you are making are the ones you need and want for business:

1. Do they have a professional headshot?

If you are in business, there is no excuse for a poor headshot...or no headshot at all. It makes you look like you are not serious about business. "Selfies" do not cut it! It makes you look broke. Hate to be blunt, but there it is. The impression you want to present is one of professionalism and a centre of influence. Personally, I do not accept connections from profiles with no headshot, unless I know them personally, or through another connection.

If you own a company, then it is your responsibility to pay for professional headshots to be done with ALL your staff. ALL your staff need to have a stellar profile, one that you would be proud to say, "they work for me".

2. Just their name goes in the name line.

They must have at least their first and last name. This is not where you put all your cuma cum lades. Your graduate degrees will show up in your education section. That is where you can list these.

3. Look for a headline that states more about how they help people.

For instance, if the profile belongs to a realtor the headline might read like this,

"Realtor | #1 in Sales 2016 |  Specializing with Farms & Ranches | Helping you find the perfect Central Alberta location for you and your family."

There are 137 characters available here, so when people use them, it makes a huge difference. This way they have differentiated themselves from all their competition. It says a lot about the person right there.

4. The Summary.

Many profiles that I check don't even have a summary and most of the ones that do have one, just list all their qualifications. They do not tell anything about who they are and why they do what they do, mixed in with what they do. There should be a professional story about them. Remember there are approximately 1200 characters available here.

What makes a profile stand out is if they also have other pictures and videos of them in business attached to their Summary.

5. Experience.

In the experience, we should be able to see a description about what they did at the different positions they have held. If there is just the name of the company and the years they worked there, that is not enough.

It is also good to see how long they have held positions. It speaks to their integrity.

6. Education

Where they studied and what was studied is important. Again, if they just list the name of the university and the years attended, you know nothing about exactly what they studied. This detail can make all the difference in your decision to connect with them.

7. Honours and Awards.

Did they receive any special awards, like a first place trophy in public speaking?

Check this out.

8. Volunteering.

Have they been a regular volunteer for a special organization? How many years have they volunteered? What was their responsibility there?

9. Endorsements.

How many people have endorsed them for skills? How many skills do they have listed?

10. Recommendations.

Check to see what people are saying about the person, and what this person has said about others.

11. People also viewed.

Check to see who else is viewing their profile. Perhaps there are some people there that you would also like to check out as well, and request an introduction.

12. What have they published?

Have they written anything that will give you insights to who they are and what inspires them to do what they do?

As we review this list, it can also inspire us to make sure we have them included in our own profiles.

So...what is your LinkedIn profile going to tell us?

More helps and tips through the Marketing Mentress.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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LI Tip #110 - Are You One of the Ninety and Nine?

27Nov

Do you have an email and password book? If not, you had better get one and pronto!!

There are programs to use online for saving email and passwords to all your platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Website, Etc. But you then need to keep the email and password for the password site someplace safe.

UGH! So my solution is to just have a password book. In fact, now I have two of them.

As a LinkedIn expert, I am usually the last person to be called in when there is a challenge.

Most people tend to go on the platform and be a "Lone Wolf". They start setting up a profile and figure they can just muddle through it themselves. If they are really not computer savvy, they might call on their son or daughter in high school to help them set up their profile. And, for the most part, setting up a basic profile on LinkedIn should be relatively simple.

However, there are other obstacles that fall into play here.

Number one obstacle is that people do not write down their email and password that they used to set up their profile with. They think that they have used the same password that they use for everything online and that way they will remember it.

Think again!

Number two obstacle is that people think that using the email they have from work is a great idea. -But what if they are no longer working at that place of business? When they try to go in months later to retrieve their LinkedIn profile, they cannot, because the email is no longer valid. This creates huge challenges because you cannot even log into your account to change the email.

Number three obstacle is that people think they will remember their email and password, and when they go to log in, nothing works.

Hmmmm! Huge challenge. Obviously they did not use the right password, because of a type-o.

So here's what many people do. They set up a new profile! Hah! Problem solved! Not really.

Number four obstacle is that people try to delete the unwanted profile, but cannot, because they cannot remember which email and password they used for which profile.

Number five obstacle is that people have set up a profile and put lots of work into it. They have used the email and password from work, and now they no longer work there. But...they did remember to change the primary email on their LinkedIn profile shortly after leaving that position.

Good one!

But they cannot remember the password. Now here's the clincher. After they have changed the email on their profile to a new one, the next time they try to log in, suddenly they no longer can log into their account with the new email and password.

Yup! They did not write them down in a place where they can always find the email and password for LinkedIn. Also, they did not make the new email their "Primary Email". Nor did they delete the old email.

More UGH!

LinkedIn invites them to set up a new profile, and not understanding what is really happening, they set up another profile, trying to use the same email and password they used for their first profile.

LinkedIn will not let you use the same email and password for more than one profile.

Do you see the scenario?

Now they have two profiles, so they think that if they go into the old profile and change the email and password to the one they have on the new profile, they will regain use of the original profile.

Think again!

Now there are two profiles with the same email and password.

If you try to delete the new profile, because it has the same email and password of the old profile, both profiles will be deleted as a result.

You need to have different emails and passwords for each profile, in order to delete the unwanted profile. BUT, now you cannot go into the old profile at all, because you have the same email and password on both profiles.

Here is your solution...get in touch with LinkedIn to help you delete the unwanted profile and give you access to the old one.

It WILL cost you money!

The key to this scenario is to get help from an expert from the beginning and you won't ever run into this kind of challenge.

I am sure that the above scenarios are confusing to many of you. The key thing to remember is to just get help from the beginning, and you will be ok. Paying for a LinkedIn coach from the start will save you money in the long run.

Got a challenge with LinkedIn? Call The Marketing Mentress. 780-904-9557

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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LI Tip #109 - How do I Write a Recommendation for Someone on LinkedIn?

27Nov

Have you been trying to figure out how to write a recommendation for someone? Or how to ask someone to write a recommendation for you?

Of all the many changes on LinkedIn, writing and asking for recommendations has become a bit of a challenge.

You used to be able to scroll down someone's profile to a section where you could write a recommendation for them. Then that changed to allowing you to only ask for a recommendation. Now it is all changed!

You can still ask for a recommendation as well as write a recommendation for anyone you are directly connected to. In other words, you can write a recommendation for people who are in your first line connections.

If you are not directly connected to someone, you cannot recommend them.

Is this a shock to you? It was to me. I spent some time working through LinkedIn to discover what the steps were for writing recommendations on LinkedIn now.

Here is what you do:

  1. Go to the 1st connection's profile.
  2. Click on the "more" button just under the headline, experience and education displayed in the top of their profile.
  3. In the drop-down menu, select whether you want to "write a recommendation or ask for a recommendation."
  4. Fill out the "relationship and position at the time" fields.
  5. Click "Next".
  6. Write a few sentences to recommend something this person has done for you or helped you with and how you are impressed with their service...or some glowing comments you feel from your heart.

Remember that the person you write a recommendation for has the freedom to accept or reject your recommendation. So be honest and heart-felt with your comments.

Recommendations are a huge asset to your LinkedIn profile. They give you a kind of credibility that you cannot do for yourself. You have others speaking in your behalf.

The more glowing recommendations you have, the better.

So, how many recommendations do you have?

I have always strived to be pro-active and write recommendations for people first. It creates a desire in them to want to reciprocate.

Write a recommendation for someone today and let me know how it went for you.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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LI Tip #108 - Why can’t I Connect to or send Inmail to some People on LinkedIn?

27Nov

Occasionally we meet profiles of people on LinkedIn that we can neither send a message to or invite to connect with us. Have you wondered why that is?

Here's the straight goods.

Some people just don't get it when it comes to the "being social" part of using LinkedIn. They get on the platform and decide that they will only connect if people are a good fit as a possible client for them. Or if people are located only in their city. Good luck on getting your connections over 500+.

I have personally had referrals from people in different parts of the world because they were connected to someone who was connected to me. They checked out the "people also viewed" section, where they found my profile. You just never know where your next lead will come from.

Remember that the larger your circle of connections, the farther your extended reach. Thus, more possible access to future business for you.

Before LinkedIn started making major changes to the platform, you could actually see what your extended reach is. At that time my reach was well over 24million, and I only had about 3500 connections. Since then my connections have tripled. It would be nice to know what my extended reach is now.

While I am on this digress, following people who have millions of followers also helps extend your reach on LinkedIn.

The reason you want to have 500+ connections on LinkedIn is because it helps you look like a center of influence. People don't know if you have 501 connections or 60,000.

There are settings in your "Privacy and Settings" menu where you can turn these features off. You can choose who can ask to connect with you and who can send you messages.

Go to your Privacy and Settings:

  1. Under the Communications Tab, you can choose who can send you connection requests.
  2. Under the Messages from Members Tab, you can choose what type of member messages you'd prefer to receive.
  3. You can add custom advice for those who contact you.

For more tips and tricks, simply send me a question on LinkedIn. I will write a blog about it, because you probably aren't the only one who would like to know.

Make it an awesome day!

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

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Li Tip # 107 - Are you sick and tired of being sick and tired of trying to do everything yourself?

13Oct

Help is here for you!

Is your online marketing for your business needing more attention than you can give it?

How much time do you have available to do all your own online marketing?

In my humble experience I have found that there is only so much time in the day before I needed to take note of how much time I spent 'on' my business and how much time I spent 'in' my business. There were some days that I literally wanted to throw up my arms!

Has that day arrived for you yet?

You probably notice that you are great at doing some things in your business, and not so great at others. Is that correct?

We cannot expect to be experts at doing everything. There are some things that we just have to bite the bullet and delegate to someone who can.

When it comes to your LinkedIn, blogging and social media marketing, what I hear many days is how business owners just do not have enough time in the day to be on their social media platforms...especially LinkedIn, every day. They do not have time to learn it, let alone work it.

So, here is an idea to mull over in your mind.

How much is your time worth? Are you worth $125 an hour or more?

If you spend 8 hours learning LinkedIn and blogging, will you know enough to be successful at it? At $125/ hour you will be spending $1000 of your valuable time in the effort.

Then count the time you spend on your social media every day. Say you spend an hour a day all together on all your platforms, including LinkedIn. Take Sundays off and that leaves you approximately 26 days a month, which is $3,250 a month of your time.

Plus you will want to learn how to blog, so count another 8 hours minimum plus an hour a week writing your blog...which will probably be more than just an hour a week when you are getting started blogging. That is another 34 hours at $125 per hour which equals $4,250. Wow! That's a total of $8,500 just for your first month!

That does not cover the investment in the training.

Training can be anywhere from $500 to$2500/day, depending on who you hire to train you per 8 hour session. So, add on say another $2000 for the LinkedIn and the Blogging training.

You are now at $10,500 start up cost for your first month.

After the first month, it will be costing you $7,000 a month just for your time spent doing your social media marketing.

Am I making sense now?

Are you wondering where you can go to get help with doing it all for you?

For less than a thousand dollars a month, you can have someone do all this for you and you can be concentrating on serving the clients that come as a result of having someone else doing your online marketing.

So, how much is one client worth to you? Let's say one new client brings you $1,000 a month. With 3-4 new clients a month, that would be bringing in $3-4,000 new money every month. By the end of one year, you could have $36,000 a month coming into your company.

Do you think it would be worthwhile hiring someone to do it for you?

Contact the experts at The Marketing Mentress.

Christine Till

The Marketing Mentress

 

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